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5th June 2010 Nuclear Abolition Day

NIS researcher Steven Hendry discusses the upcoming Nuclear Abolition day, the basic ideas behind a Nuclear Weapons Convention and its possible place alongside the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty.

One week on from the closing of the Nuclear Non-proliferation Review Conference (NPT) in New York, Anti-nuclear activists around the globe will gather on June 5th to call for a global nuclear weapons convention (NWC). Many activists had hoped that this years review would end with a commitment to building a NWC.  However, it didn't - hence the need for action.

Labour's legacy means it is even more imperative to include Trident in the defence review.

A report in the Irish Independent newspaper reveals that, in post-election negotiations with the Liberal Democrats, the Labour party was prepared to make concessions in its position over Trident replacement.

Fox announces that Strategic Defence Review begins immediately. But what place Trident?

NIS researcher Steve Hendry assesses how the new Conservative - Liberal Democrat government is dealing with the issue of Trident replacement.


Size is important



The USA has released information about the size of its nuclear weapons stockpile

Will US cost-cutting threaten the UK's Trident replacement programme?




US Defense Secretary Robert Gates - sceptical about Trident replacement

 

We're already forking out a third of a million every day to replace Trident



With nuclear weapons and
the huge cost of replacing Trident rapidly moving up the election
agenda, advoc

You can't slip a Rizla between Labour and the Tories on nuclear weapons

As the three party leaders slug it out on prime-time television, another pre-election debate has shown just how out of touch with reality the main parties are when it comes to defence and nuclear weapons.

Just before the first of the three televised debates between Gordon Brown, David Cameron, and Nick Clegg was broadcast I went along to a debate where figures from each of the main parties  were discussing defence issues.

America can and Russia can - so why can't Britain?

President Obama's nuclear diplomacy agenda has taken some significant steps forward this week: firstly with the launch of the US Nuclear Posture Review, and then with the signing of a new US - Russia arms control treaty that will reduce the number of strategic nuclear warheads that each country has deployed.  The momentum will continue into next week, when the President is hosting a global nuclear security summit in Washington.

Why the main parties won't be mentioning Trident

A general election will be called this week, and we can look forward to a month of frantic political campaigning before voting day on May 6th .  With the economy still very weak it's a certainty that all the political parties will be focusing on their economic policies  Cuts in spending to balance the national deficit are likely to be a hot topic of debate, but I'm willing to bet that the three main parties will want to say very much less about nuclear weapons and Trident replacement.

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