Subscribe to media

media

Judicial Review of the government's decision to renew the Trident nuclear weapons system

We have now submitted our Appeal Skeleton Argument. The MoD have an opportunity to answer our points, then a High Court judge looks at both papers to assess the chances of a successful Appeal. If s/he refuses an Appeal, we have the right to an oral hearing when our barrister puts our case in the high court. If we are granted an Appeal on the papers alone, work starts to prepare the case in detail.

£2bn bonus for US corporations if government goes ahead with Trident replacement

Recent reports in the Guardian show that there is a hidden bonus of over £2bn to US corporations if the government goes ahead with building new nuclear warheads.

American firm Lockheed Martin has a large share in the management and ownership of the UK's nuclear weapons factories at Aldermaston.

Planning approval for new nuclear warhead 'conventional components' facility expected in 13th Aug 08

Britain plans to spend £3bn on new nuclear warheads. Decision breaches non-proliferation treaty, opponents say. 

Matthew Taylor, The Guardian, Friday July 25 2008

Trident warhead replacement confirmed

The Guardian reports that David Gould, former chief operating officer at the Defence Equipment and Support Organisation, stated in June 2007 that AWE would build a new Trident warhead. At a defence industry conference Mr Gould said: "The intention is to replace the entire Vanguard class submarine system. Including the warhead and missile." 

Minister confirms replacement plans for aging gravel gertie bunkers

New nuclear missile assembly plants will be built at AWE Burghfield, if West Berkshire Council approves plans due to be submitted later this year.

They would replace the aging “gravel gerties” safe rooms, believed to be subject of a series of safety shortfalls which last year caused a shut down of live operations at the nuclear missile plant.

Could Trident nuclear warheads accidentially go off 'like popcorn'?

From issue 2662 of New Scientist magazine, 26 June 2008, page 18: You might think nuclear weapons have been carefully designed not to go off by accident. Yet more than 1700 of them have design flaws that could conceivably cause multiple warheads to explode one after another - an effect known as "popcorning" - according to a UK Ministry of Defence safety manual.

Press Release - Legal challenge of Trident Replacement and Failed Consultation

Nuclear Information Service is calling for governmental accountability on questions of illegality and due process in the replacement and maintenance of the UK’s nuclear weapon system proposed in the Government’s White Paper, ‘The Future of the United Kingdom’s Nuclear Deterrent’, published on 4 December 2006.

Reading Post on AWE Burghfield floods

The July storm which caused flooding across the country last year forced the shutdown of the Burghfield atomic bomb factory, it has been revealed.

In a question in the House of Commons last week, Portsmouth South MP Mike Hancock asked defence minister Bob Ainsworth on whose authority the “live nuclear work was suspended at AWE Burghfield?”

Read the full Reading Post article here.

AWE Burghfield Warhead Plant Stops Operations

Jamie Doward, Home Affairs Editor, The Observer, 25th May 2008
Trident plant shut down in safety alert- Work at missile factory was suspended in secret after watchdog threatened to withhold licence.

Dropping the Bomb

Do we need to worry about nuclear weapons any more? After the end of the Cold War, the world stepped back from the brink of mutually-assured annihilation and nuclear stockpiles were halved. But nukes haven't gone away. In fact, they are undergoing something of a renaissance. India, Pakistan and North Korea have all recently joined the nuclear club. The US, Russia, Britain, China and France are spending billions on 'modernizing' their nuclear arsenals. So why are disarmament campaigners so upbeat?

Pages